For this assessment, you will be provided with a case study and asked to prepare a succinct introduction to the client in the form of case notes. Your case notes will need to align with ethical requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS).

Assignment Task

Description
For this assessment, you will be provided with a case study and asked to prepare a succinct introduction to the client in the form of case notes. Your case notes will need to align with ethical requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). This is achieved through the identification of  potential ethical and risk management issues which may be relevant for this case.
Using your case notes as a reference point you will then prepare a treatment recommendation for the client. You will be expected to select one therapeutic approach which you could use in your treatment of this case. For both the case notes and treatment recommendation you should consider any cross- cultural issues where relevant.

Case Notes

Acting as the therapist you will be taking case notes of the client history based on the case study provided. These notes should provide biographical information and a basic overview of the issues the client presents with. You will have had some practise doing this in an activity in Week 3. You need to refine your notes to align with ethical requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS), identifying potential ethical and risk management issues which may be relevant for this case.

Case study – Anday Lee

Andy, a 25-year-old single man of Chinese descent, lives with his mother and brother. He works as a mail sorter at the post office, a job he has had since he dropped out of University after two years. He came to see you at your clinic complaining of anxiety (“nervousness”). He says that right now he is “just going through the motions” and wants “to lead a normal life and go back to Uni.” During his adolescence and young adulthood, Andy had no close friends and was usually by himself. When he entered University, he formed several close friendships but became “more self-conscious” when speaking to strangers and classmates.

He would feel nervous, and experience “buzzing” in his head, had hot flashes, and perspired. These feelings came on suddenly, within seconds, and only when he was with people. When a classmate spoke to him, he sometimes “couldn’t hear” what the classmate was saying because of his nervousness. Outside class, Andy began to feel uncomfortable in social situations. “I think that I was afraid of saying or doing something stupid.” He is contemplating having to turn down invitations to parties and other social activities (e.g., bowling league). After initially getting involved with social media (Facebook) he is already considering shutting down his account – he said that there was contact with some people he went to school with which made him uncomfortable.

Andy was average height, with a skinny frame. He greeted you when he entered the office and was polite during conversation. He didn’t have difficulty responding to your questions, however, he did not speak unless you asked him a question. Even when answering questions, he did not respond more than was needed. As the session progressed, perspiration was obvious, and his gaze started shifting towards the ground. When you bring up the topic of his relationship with classmates, he would seem distracted and you would need to repeat your questions a few times before he could answer.

Andy explains the reason he chose to work at the post office is that the job reduces the need for him to deal with people. When asked about other things that make him nervous, he says he feels more comfortable in a public bathroom when the lights are dim, when there are few people present, and when he can use a stall rather than a urinal. Andy has two long-standing “best” friends with whom he socialises regularly and feels completely comfortable. However, he hasn’t dated since he was at University, and he usually avoids group settings, such as weddings, pubs or clubs. He feels that no one would date him due to his ethnic background. He has no problem with authority figures though, and even welcomes constructive criticism from his supervisor at the post office. “My problem is nervousness, not obstinacy.